You are not connected. Please login or register

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

avatar
rE-BoOt
 

 
http://www.pixibotz.com
Index

  • What is BOINC

  • Install

  • Add projects

  • Configure

  • Account Manager




What is BOINC
BOINC lets you contribute computing power on your home PC (and other devices) to projects doing research in many scientific areas.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] said:

The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) is an open source middleware system for volunteer and grid computing. It was originally developed to support the SETI@home project before it became useful as a platform for other distributed applications in areas as diverse as mathematics, medicine, molecular biology, climatology, environmental science, and astrophysics. The intent of BOINC is to make it possible for researchers to tap into the enormous processing power of personal computers around the world.



How it works
When you run BOINC on your PC, it does the following:
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

The BOINC software that will be installed on your computer is made up of several separate programs:
The core client communicates with external servers to get and report work, and runs and controls applications (the programs that do scientific computing). Several applications may run at the same time on a computer with more than one CPU.
The GUI (BOINC manager) provides a graphical interface that lets you control the core client.
The screensaver runs when you're away from the computer. It communicates with the core client instructing it to tell one of the applications to generate screensaver graphics. Note that not all projects provide screensaver graphics.


Installing BOINC
Before downloading and installing BOINC you may want to read about the projects you can contribute to.
List of all the available downloads

Windows
Download and run the installer.

The install process is quite straightforward. The advanced installation options (install as service, use screensaver, users permission) are the only remarkable, and self-explanatory.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]


GNU/Linux
You can install BOINC on a Linux computer in any of three ways (each of one has its pros and cons, in terms of difficulty and the performance achieved):

  • Use the package management system of your Linux distribution;

  • Use the "Berkeley installer" provided by BOINC (a self-extracting archive, not distro-specific);

  • Build directly from source code.



Some Linux distributions (Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Gentoo, possibly others) have BOINC packages that you can install using your distribution's package manager.

There are two packages that can be installed separately, one for BOINC Client (boinc-client) and another for BOINC Manager(boinc-manager). Only the client part is required but you will likely want to install the manager as well unless you intend to manage the client from a remote host.

The BOINC manager is a graphic user interface that provides the ability to control a BOINC client and all of its functions. The manager can connect to BOINC clients running on the same or different computers. There is a version of the BOINC manager available for both Linux and Windows. This means that you can run the BOINC manager on your windows computer and connect to BOINC clients running on your Linux servers.


Often, for sake of simplicity, related packages are grouped in a metapackage. For instance, the BOINC metapackage will instruct the system to install the BOINC Client, the BOINC Manager, and its dependencies.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Example of a metapackage in Linux Mint 17.1

To install BOINC from the GUI, open the system menu and search for Software in order to find your distribution's package manager or software manager (Software Centre/Manager/Store, Apper, YaST2...). Once you are in the corresponding package manager you can search for boinc and install the packages (boinc-client, boinc-manager).


_________________

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
avatar
rE-BoOt
 

 
http://www.pixibotz.com
Debian Family (Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and others)
Tested on Ubuntu 14.04 and 14.10 (64 bit); Linux Mint 17.1 (32/64 bit) with MATE and Cinnamon Desktop Environments.

For Ubuntu 14 and Linux Mint 17.1 both packages are in the official software repositories. You can install them either from the GUI (Software Centre or Software Manager) or from the command line (Terminal).

To install them from the command line open the Terminal and execute the following command:
Code:
[ltr]sudo apt-get install boinc-client boinc-manager[/ltr]

If BOINC metapackage is available you can use this shorter command instead:
Code:
[ltr]sudo apt-get install boinc[/ltr]

As the installation of programs requires additional privileges (triggered by sudo) you will be prompted for your password.
Spoiler

Either you use the GUI or the Terminal, BOINC will be configured to automatically run when you start your computer.


Fedora
Tested on Fedora 21 Gnome 3 (64 bit) with systemd

The BOINC packages are also available in Fedora 21 (possibly on older version too).
You can install BOINC making use of the Software store (GUI) but most likely you'll have to make additional changes from the command line.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Error running BOINC Manager from a non-root account – Unable to connect to the core client.

To install BOINC from the command line run these commands (lines starting with # are comments):
Code:
[ltr]# Execute commands as superuser ( use with caution! )
su

# Install BOINC
yum install boinc-client boinc-manager

# Enable BOINC autostart on boot
systemctl enable boinc-client.service

# Start BOINC service
systemctl start boinc-client.service

# Add user to boinc group (replace 'username' with your linux user)
usermod -G boinc -a username

# Link the BOINC authentication file to your user's home folder (replace 'username' with your linux user)
ln -s /var/lib/boinc/gui_rpc_auth.cfg /home/username/gui_rpc_auth.cfg

# Exit superuser session
exit
[/ltr]

After you logout and login again (so that your new group membership takes effect), boinc-manager should be able to connect to boinc-client.


OpenSUSE
Tested on OpenSUSE 13.2 KDE (64 bit) with systemd
Code:
[ltr]# Execute commands as superuser ( use with caution! )
su

# Install BOINC
zypper install boinc-client boinc-manager

# Enable BOINC autostart on boot
systemctl enable boinc-client.service

# Start BOINC service
systemctl start boinc-client.service

# Add your user to boinc group (replace 'username' with your linux user)
usermod -G boinc -a username

# Link the BOINC authentication file to your user's home folder (replace 'username' with your linux user)
ln -s /var/lib/boinc/gui_rpc_auth.cfg /home/username/gui_rpc_auth.cfg

# Exit superuser session
exit
[/ltr]

(*) lines starting with # are comments

After you logout and login again boinc-manager should be able to connect to boinc-client.

After executing BOINC Manager from the KDE system menu it was still showing the Unable to connect to the core client error message.
Running boinc-manager or boincmgr from the command line ended with the same result. But running boinc-gui command worked.
The BOINC Manager shortcut was pointing to boinc-manager. So, to make it work, I edited the shortcut in order to launch boinc-manager through the boinc-gui wrapper.

To change the shortcut, edit its file from the command line:
Code:
[ltr]sudo nano /usr/share/applications/boinc-gui.desktop[/ltr]

When you see the file contents, replace the line
Code:
[ltr]Exec=boinc-manager[/ltr]

with
Code:
[ltr]Exec=boinc-gui[/ltr]

If you opened the file with nano editor, use CTRL+O to save the file changes. Then press the ENTER key to confirm changes. And CTRL+X to exit nano.


Manjaro (possibly other Arch-based linux distro's)
Tested on Manjaro 0.8.11 xfce (64 bit) with systemd
Code:
[ltr]# Execute commands as superuser ( use with caution! )
su

# Install BOINC
pacman -S boinc

# Enable BOINC autostart on boot
systemctl enable boinc.service

# Start BOINC service
systemctl start boinc.service

# Add your user to boinc group (replace 'username' with your linux user)
usermod -G boinc -a username

# Add group permissions to the authentication file
chmod g+r /var/lib/boinc/gui_rpc_auth.cfg

# Exit superuser session
exit
[/ltr]

(*) lines starting with # are comments

After you logout and login again boinc-manager should be able to connect to boinc-client.

Note that this time we have not linked the authentication file to the user's home folder.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] said:

BOINC Manager will also look for a readable gui_rpc_auth.cfg file in the current working directory. If you make the file readable by the boinc group and ensure that the manager is run with /var/lib/boinc as the working directory, you should find that the client connects to the daemon automatically, as desired.


So this step is optional, but on other arch-based Linux distributions you may have to link the authentication file to your user's home folder:
Code:
[ltr]# Link the boinc authentication file to your user's home folder (replace 'username' with your linux user)
ln -s /var/lib/boinc/gui_rpc_auth.cfg /home/username/gui_rpc_auth.cfg
[/ltr]

For more details on the installation process and instructions for other operating systems (Mac OS, Android, FreeBSD...) take a look at the manual and explore additional resources.


_________________

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
avatar
rE-BoOt
 

 
http://www.pixibotz.com
Add projects to BOINC
Once BOINC is installed you can add the projects you want to contribute to (if you haven't yet chosen a project, do so now). You can contribute to a single project, or to any combination of them.

BOINC projects covers different areas: Mathematics, Astronomy, Astrophysics, biochemistry, climate study, mechanical engineering, cryptography, biology and medicine... You even can mine cryptocurrencies.

In this example we will add the World Community Grid project, dedicated to scientific research on topics related to health, poverty and sustainability.

First, you should read about the project and create an account. If you plan to contribute to multiple projects consider using an account manager (more on that later).

Your account on a BOINC-based project is identified by a name that you choose. This name may be shown on the project's web site, along with a summary of the work your computer has done for the project and other BOINC projects. If you want to be anonymous, choose a name that doesn't reveal your identity.



To participate in a BOINC-based project, you must give an address where you receive email. This address will not be shown on the project's web site or shared with organizations. The project may send you periodic newsletters; however, you can choose not to be sent these at any time.


Once you have created an account, you will be able to attach the project to BOINC using your username and password.

The first time you open BOINC Manager it will show a wizard to add a project (you can use the Add Project button at any time later).
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

The program will show a list of projects you can choose from. To join a project not in the list, enter the URL of its web site.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Once you choose a project, you will be asked for the username and password.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

If all goes well, the project will be added...
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

...and will start running tasks
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
BOINC Manager – Simple View Mode

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
BOINC Manager – Advanced View Mode


If you participate in a BOINC-based project, information about your computer (such as its processor type, amount of memory, etc.) will be recorded by the project and used to decide what type of work to assign to your computer. This information will also be shown on the project's web site. Nothing that reveals your computer's location (e.g. its domain name or network address) will be visible to anyone but you.


If you prefer to use the command line, you can attach the project using your account key:
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Attaching the project from the command line (linux):
Code:
[ltr]cd /var/lib/boinc
sudo -u boinc boinccmd --project_attach [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] [/ltr]



BOINC Configuration
When you run BOINC on your computer, it will use part of the computer's CPU power, disk space, and network bandwidth. You can control how much of your resources are used by BOINC, and when it uses them.

In order to control how BOINC operates there are two ways you can set and change the general preferences: on the web, and in the BOINC Manager.

On the web:

You can edit preferences on the web site of any project in which you participate. If you do this, then:

  • The changes will take effect on ALL the computers attached to that account; this is handy if you have a lot of computers.
  • The changes will take effect on a given computer the next time that computer contacts the project's server. This typically happens automatically every day or so. You can do it manually by selecting the project in the BOINC Manager (Advanced View) and clicking Update.



In the BOINC Manager:

You can edit general preferences using a dialog in the BOINC manager.
BOINC 6: Use the Preferences button in the Simple View or use the Advanced->Preferences menu item in the Advanced View;
BOINC 7: Use the Tools->Computing preferences menu item in Simple View, or the Tools->Computing preferences menu item in theAdvanced View;

These bring up different dialogs - the Advanced version displays more preferences. If you use this approach, then:

  • Changes will take effect immediately upon clicking OK in the dialog.
  • Changes will affect ONLY the local computer
  • Settings override preferences set on the web.

[size]
Local preferences are stored in a file that you can edit directly.
See local preferences for more information.
[/size]
Click to expand...


Note that the general preferences apply to all projects.

From Computing Preferences window, in Simple View mode, you will be able to set the period of time in which BOINC can compute data, when it can connect to Internet, how much disk space and CPU it can use, and a couple of additional options.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Local Preferences as seen from BOINC Manager in Simple View mode

The Computing Preferences window in Advanced View mode provides more control. You can program BOINC to work at certain weekdays between the hours you choose, set limits for network and storage usage, and suspend BOINC's processor and network usage when the specified applications are running.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Local Preferences as seen from BOINC Manager in Advanced View mode

On Windows, when you try to close BOINC Manager its icon will reside in the taskbar's notification area:
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

From there you can open BOINC Manager, temporally stop work (Snooze), or exit BOINC Manager.
When you choose to exit BOINC Manager it will let you close BOINC Manager but keep BOINC tasks running in the background or close and stop both.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Even when BOINC Manager is closed, you can find if BOINC and the tasks are running looking at your operating system task manager:
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Windows 7 Task Manager

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
BOINC tasks as seen from (Linux) System Monitor

From Windows, you also can go to Tools > Options menu in order to enable or disable BOINC Manager run at login, and set how it should connect to the Internet (Proxy, VPN...)
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]


_________________

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
avatar
rE-BoOt
 

 
http://www.pixibotz.com
Using an Account Manager
If you want to contribute to many projects, it will be easier to use an account manager in order to attach projects from a single place.

An account manager is a web site where you can browse BOINC-based projects, and attach or detach them. This simplifies participating in BOINC, especially if you

  • are new to BOINC
  • have several computers
  • participate in several projects
  • like to learn about new projects.


Click to expand...


[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Two account managers for BOINC are BOINC Account Manager (BAM!) and GridRepublic.
To start using an account manager you have to go to the Account Manager webpage and create a new account.
If you are an existing BOINC user then the projects where you already have an account will be imported when you attach your account manager to your BOINC clients.

As an example, we will create a new BAM! Account filling the Registration Form:
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

After creating the account we will receive a confirmation code in the provided email address.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
confirmation email

After validating the email you will be able to login.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Your BAM! account will be almost empty. If you have not joined yet to any project you will be able to do it from the BAM!'s Sign-up for projects menu. If you already are a BOINC user you can click "Find account" to add an existing project account to your BAM account.

BAM! can only find accounts when the email address, the username and the password of the project are the same as those of BAM!.


In either case, once you have registered with an account manager, you will have to attach each of your clients to the account manager.

From BOINC Manager in simple view mode press the Add Project button. If you are using the Advanced view mode use the Tools > Add project or account manager... menu instead.

On the next screen select the Use account manager option and click the Next button.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Select you account manager (or enter its URL) and click the Next button.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Use your BAM!'s username and password and click the Next button.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

You account manager is now attached to BOINC.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]


To attach to your account manager from the command line using Boinccmd, simply issue the command
Code:
[ltr]boinccmd --join_acct_mgr URL name password[/ltr]


To attach a new project from BAM! using the Sign-up for projects page click on the project's create account icon.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

The project will be transferred from that list to My projects. From there you can assign the project to the clients you choose, in this case I'll choose to attach the project to all clients (to all hosts).
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

The next time the client synchronizes with the account manager the project will be assigned to it. You can do it manually by clicking the Synchronize button (simple view) or by using the Tools > Synchronize with... menu (advanced view).
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]



BOINC is also capable of using GPU calculation power for the projects that support this feature, if your graphics card comply with the minimum requirements. You can find more information in the User Manual.

Here we've just seen some of the basics involving running BOINC with its official Manager, but there are more advanced topics you can explore: deploy boinc on a network, configure the clients across the globe from the projects webpage, create teams and see your stats, etc.

Being Open Source, some projects have a customized version of BOINC, mostly cosmetic changes. But there are also third-party software and add-ons that implement a completely different interface to manage BOINC: BoincTask is one of them.

----------
User Manual
Computing with a GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) | Graphics Card Processing
Virtual computing with VirtualBox
Controlling BOINC remotely
The boinccmd command-line tool
Add-on software
Heat and energy considerations
BOINC Security
Locating stolen computers


_________________

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
Sponsored content

View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum